Healthcare Blog

Archive for June, 2016

The Patients Just Don’t Get It (Or Maybe It’s You That Doesn’t Get It)

Posted by capcityspeakers on June 30, 2016

by Kristin Baird

Just the other day, I heard a story from a nursing unit manager that really annoyed me. The manager was asked to follow up on a patient complaint where the patient stated he was disappointed that the entire time he was in the hospital, he never had a bath. Having been an inpatient for four days following a total hip replacement, it seemed like a reasonable expectation to have a bath (or four for that matter), so his complaint seemed justifiable.  The problem was, the manager shifted the blame onto the patient. The first words out of her mouth were, “These patients just don’t get it. We give them a bath-in-a-bag every day.”

There is so much about this single comment that bugs me, but let’s just start with, “They just don’t get it.” The tone implies the patient is wrong and you, the care provider, are right. This type of thinking places you and the patient, in two separate camps; the right and the wrong. One or the other. Secondly, it implies that the patient should know better; again, a condescending posture for the sender.

Whenever I hear the phrase, “They just don’t get it,” I can’t help but think that it’s the sender that doesn’t get it. The comment comes from a posture of superiority and arrogance rather than one of collaboration. What if the nurse manager received the complaint in a spirit of ownership and collaboration? Her response would have been something like, “It sounds like we didn’t do a good job of explaining the bath-in-a-bag. I’ll work on this with my team.”

The other part of this comment that bugs me is the idea that the patient should “get it.” When a patient enters a hospital, it is a foreign land with a foreign language, strange sounds, sights, and smells. This is YOUR world, not theirs. Don’t expect them to just “get it.” It’s up to the caregivers to welcome patients into this strange world, and explain things. The word “bath” in the common vernacular implies a tub filled with water. A bed bath implies a basin of water and a wash cloth. It’s only in today’s healthcare world that a plastic packet filled with moistened paper towels constitutes a bath. So when the patient doesn’t “get it,” simply reposition the lens with which you see the world. Look through the patient’s eyes, then help him understand.

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Changing Your Mental Channel

Posted by capcityspeakers on June 15, 2016

by Kathleen Passanisi

Television has done much for psychiatry by spreading information about it, as well as contributing to the need for it.-Alfred Hitchcock

It’s been called the “idiot box.” It’s been called “the greatest single invention of the 20th century.” Either way, to say that television is a huge part of daily American life is to state the overwhelmingly obvious. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, “American children and adolescents spend 22 to 28 hours per week viewing television, more than any other activity except sleeping. By the age of 70 they will have spent 7 to 10 years of their lives watching TV.” The effects of sleep on mind and body have been well documented. But what comes of all this “tube time?”

How does television affect the mind? In order to understand how television effects our health, we must first understand how it affects the mind. Several studies have shown that the longer one watches television, the easier it is for their mind to slip into “Alpha state.” Here, the brain’s waves are slow and steady. This hypnotic trace-like state is the brain’s most receptive mode. Images and suggestions have maximum impact in this mode. Why else would advertisers spend up to one billion dollars per year on television advertising? But what about what’s between the commercials?

Read the rest of this entry »

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The Tug of Time

Posted by capcityspeakers on June 2, 2016

by Kathy Brown

Have you felt the tug of “too much to do in too little time” in too many areas of your life?

Temporary is the new “normal” so change is constant. That can be very wearing on our stressed out coping skills as we constantly adjust our lives to fit the variety of needs of our family and work place. Did lack of sleep and time to eat, much less cook something nutritious, get mentioned yet? Throw a pet into the mix just to keep things interesting. Let’s not forget our aging parents who may live near enough to be of some help OR need help themselves. How’s all that working for you so far?

Goal setting should be a lifestyle or it can simply be a tool to ensure progress. We need to constantly learn more efficient ways to work smarter not harder as our areas of responsibility increase . Collaboration of our time and resources both personally and professionally can set a positive emotional environment where we help one another achieve a greater balance while keeping each other accountable! Your joys get multiplied and your challenges get cut in half when you share your needs and goals with others who will support and encourage you.

Laughter ignites a healing balm of happy that soothes our soul and lubricates our lungs. It is both contagious and addicting. Smiles can infect others who willingly join your group of family members and friends who can then start an epidemic of joy. This will stamp out “hurry sickness” which thrives in the petrie dish of doing too much. Start managing and investing your time and energy into things that have the most significance to you. Take a humor break. Leave a legacy of love and laughter. Just be yourself. Everyone else is taken. :-)

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